Entertainment :: Television

Sasha Roiz :: Playing Caprica’s gay bad boy

by Jim Halterman
Contributor
Friday Feb 26, 2010
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Whether he realizes it or not, actor Sasha Roiz is breaking new ground with his role on the new SyFy (and pre-Battlestar Galactica) series Caprica. As Sam Adama, who happens to be the Uncle to William Adama (the same Adama who will one day command the famous vessel 58-years in the future), Roiz’s character is not only a part of the underground mob but he’s also openly gay with a solid relationship in a world where discrimination no longer exists. Sounds like paradise, right? Thankfully, sexuality takes a back seat to the other issues that are explored on the new hit series.

To find out more about Roiz’s portrayal of Sam and his many loyalties, if Sam’s sexy tattoos are real as well as how Roiz hopes our current society can get to the same place as Caprica in terms of discrimination, EDGE’s Jim Halterman had some one-on-one time with Roiz.


A world without discrimination

EDGE: The role of Sam was expanded to series regular after the pilot was shot but before that happened did you have a feeling your character could be more important to the show and overall story?

Sasha Roiz: I did. I felt that there was potential for the character. While we were shooting the pilot, I thought I personally would enjoy seeing where this character goes and the world that he exists in because it would introduce this entire sub-world that we only hint at a little bit in the pilot. I thought it would be a very interesting place to go.

EDGE: When you found out that Sam was going to be gay, how did you approach it as an actor?

SR: Well, I was very surprised at first because I didn’t perceive him as gay when I played him in the pilot but then it was explained to me that it wouldn’t effect it all that much because it’s a world without any kind of discrimination in regards to sexuality so I realized there was not a need to alter the performance at least in regards to that. It was just going to be an interesting statement and another layer to this character and an interesting statement about this society at large. To be honest, I really don’t dwell too much on him being straight or gay. I just am more excited by the fact that he’s a more stable, monogamous individual in a loving relationship. That affects the character much more than his sexual orientation. It doesn’t inform me all that much but I do love the statement it makes and I love the effect it casts on the viewers.



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